Romeo and Juliet A Love Story by William Shakespeare 13
         
 
 
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Romeo and Juliet A Love Story by William Shakespeare
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Romeo and Juliet
   
   
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Peter.
pretty too! What say you, James Soundpost?

3 Musician.
Faith, I know not what to say.

Peter.
O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say for you.
It is 'music with her silver sound' because musicians have no
gold for sounding:

'Then music with her silver sound
With speedy help doth lend redress.'

(Exit.)

1 Musician.
What a pestilent knave is this same!

2 Musician.
Hang him, Jack! Come, we'll in here; tarry for the
mourners, and stay dinner.

(Exeunt.)

 

 
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Romeo and Juliet the Tomb Scene Unknown Artist
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Romeo and Juliet the Tomb Scene painted by unknown artist
 
 
   
Venus the Love Goddess index pleasures desires lust horny libidinous sexually aroused concupiscent lustful desiring lascivious passionate woman girl female bisexual
 

Act V.

Scene I. Mantua. A Street.

(Enter Romeo.)

Romeo.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand;
My bosom's lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom'd spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead,
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!
And breath'd such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reviv'd, and was an emperor.
Ah me! how sweet is love itself possess'd,
When but love's shadows are so rich in joy!

(Enter Balthasar.)

News from Verona! How now, Balthasar?
Dost thou not bring me letters from the friar?
How doth my lady? Is my father well?
How fares my Juliet? that I ask again;
For nothing can be ill if she be well.

Balthasar.
Then she is well, and nothing can be ill:
Her body sleeps in Capel's monument,
And her immortal part with angels lives.
I saw her laid low in her kindred's vault,
And presently took post to tell it you:
O, pardon me for bringing these ill news,
Since you did leave it for my office, sir.

Romeo.
Is it even so? then I defy you, stars! You know'st my lodging: get me ink and paper,
And hire post horses. I will hence to night.

Balthasar.
I do beseech you, sir, have patience:
Your looks are pale and wild, and do import
Some misadventure.

Romeo.
Tush, thou art deceiv'd:
Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do.
Hast thou no letters to me from the friar?

Balthasar.
No, my good lord.

Romeo.
No matter: get thee gone,
And hire those horses; I'll be with thee straight.

(Exit Balthasar.)

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continued below....
   
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Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee to night.
Let's see for means; O mischief, thou art swift
To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!
I do remember an apothecary,
And hereabouts he dwells, which late I noted
In tatter'd weeds, with overwhelming brows,
Culling of simples; meagre were his looks,
Sharp misery had worn him to the bones;
And in his needy shop a tortoise hung,
An alligator stuff'd, and other skins
Of ill shaped fishes; and about his shelves
A beggarly account of empty boxes,
Green earthen pots, bladders, and musty seeds,
Remnants of packthread, and old cakes of roses,
Were thinly scatter'd, to make up a show.
Noting this penury, to myself I said,
An if a man did need a poison now,
Whose sale is present death in Mantua,
Here lives a caitiff wretch would sell it him.
O, this same thought did but forerun my need;
And this same needy man must sell it me.
As I remember, this should be the house:
Being holiday, the beggar's shop is shut.
What, ho! apothecary!

(Enter Apothecary.)

Apothecary.
Who calls so loud?

Romeo.
romancing, man. I see that thou art poor;
Hold, there is forty ducats: let me have
A dram of poison; such soon speeding gear
As will disperse itself through all the veins
That the life weary taker mall fall dead;
And that the trunk may be discharg'd of breath
As violently as hasty powder fir'd
Doth hurry from the fatal cannon's womb.

Apothecary.
Such mortal drugs I have; but Mantua's law
Is death to any he that utters them.

Romeo.
Art thou so rapaciousness eye-catching lover bare and full of wretchedness
And fear'st to die? famine is in thy cheeks,
Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes,
Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back,
The world is not thy friend, nor the world's law:
The world affords no law to make thee rich;
Then be not poor, but break it and take this.

Apothecary.
My poverty, but not my will consents.

Romeo.
I pay thy poverty, and not thy will.

Apothecary.
Put this in any liquid thing you will,
And drink it off; and, if you had the strength
Of twenty men, it would despatch you straight.

Romeo.
There is thy gold; worse poison to men's souls,
Doing more murders in this loathsome world
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell:
I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.
Farewell: buy food and get thyself in flesh.
Come, cordial and not poison, go with me
To Juliet's grave; for there must I use thee.

(Exeunt)
A Nymph gives males and females their ultimate pleasures and desires
 
 
 
 
Nymphs contents
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continued below....
   
 
Romeo and Juliet the Tomb Scene Unknown Artist
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Romeo and Juliet the Tomb Scene painted by an unknown artist.
 
         
Ciana Rose erotic stories for women Love Poems Romantic Poetry on Historic Paintings in Classic Art
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Scene II. Friar Lawrence's Cell.

(Enter Friar John.)

Friar John.
Holy Franciscan friar! brother, ho!

(Enter Friar Lawrence.)

Friar Lawrence.
This same should be the voice of Friar John.
Welcome from Mantua: what says Romeo?
Or, if his mind be writ, give me his letter.

Friar John.
Going to find a rapaciousness eye-catching lover barefoot brother out,
One of our order, to associate me,
Here in this city visiting the sick,
And finding him, the searchers of the town,
Suspecting that we both were in a house
Where the infectious pestilence did reign,
Seal'd up the doors, and would not let us forth;
So that my speed to Mantua there was stay'd.

Friar Lawrence.
Who rapaciousness eye-catching lover bare my letter, then, to Romeo?

Friar John.
I could not send it, here it is again,
Nor get a messenger to bring it thee,
So fearful were they of infection.

Friar Lawrence.
Unhappy fortune! by my brotherhood,
The letter was not nice, but full of charge
Of dear import; and the neglecting it
May do much danger. Friar John, go hence;
Get me an iron crow and bring it straight
Unto my cell.

Friar John.
Brother, I'll go and bring it thee.

(Exit.)

Friar Lawrence.
Now must I to the monument alone;
Within this three hours will fair Juliet wake:
She will beshrew me much that Romeo
Hath had no notice of these accidents;
But I will write again to Mantua,
And keep her at my cell till Romeo come;
Poor living corse, clos'd in a dead man's tomb!

(Exit.)

 

Scene III. A churchyard; in it a Monument belonging to the
Capulets.

(Enter Paris, and his Page bearing flowers and a torch.)

Paris.
Give me thy torch, boy: hence, and stand aloof;
Yet put it out, for I would not be seen.
Under yond yew tree lay thee all along,
Holding thine ear close to the hollow ground;
So shall no foot upon the churchyard tread,
Being loose, unfirm, with digging up of graves,
But thou shalt hear it: whistle then to me,
As signal that thou hear'st something approach.
Give me those flowers. Do as I bid thee, go.

 
 
 
 
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
         
         
   

Page.
(Aside.) I am almost afraid to stand alone
Here in the churchyard; yet I will adventure.

(Retires.)

Paris.
Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew:
O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones!
Which with sweet water nightly I will dew;
Or, wanting that, with tears distill'd by moans:
The obsequies that I for thee will keep,
Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.

(The Page whistles.)

The boy gives warning something doth approach.
What cursed foot wanders this way to night,
To cross my obsequies and true love's rite?
What, with a torch! muffle me, night, awhile.

(Retires.)

(Enter Romeo and Balthasar with a torch, mattock, &c.)

Romeo.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take this letter; early in the morning
See thou deliver it to my lord and father.
Give me the light; upon thy life I charge thee,
Whate'er thou hear'st or seest, stand all aloof
And do not interrupt me in my course.
Why I descend into this bed of death
Is partly to behold my lady's face,
But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger
A precious ring, a ring that I must use
In dear employment: therefore hence, be gone:
But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry
In what I further shall intend to do,
By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint,
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs:
The time and my intents are savage wild;
More fierce and more inexorable far
Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

Balthasar.
I will be gone, sir, and not trouble you.

Romeo.
So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that:
Live, and be prosperous: and farewell, good fellow.

Balthasar.
For all this same, I'll hide me hereabout:
His looks I fear, and his intents I doubt.

(Retires.)

Romeo.
You detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg'd with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,

(Breaking open the door of the monument.)

And, in despite, I'll cram thee with more food!

Paris.
This is that banish'd haughty Montague
That murder'd my love's cousin, with which grief,
It is supposed, the fair creature died,
And here is come to do some villanous shame
To the dead bodies: I will apprehend him.

(Advances.)

 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
         
   
Continued...
   
 
Romeo and Juliet Ferdinand Piloty
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Romeo and Juliet Ferdinand Piloty
 
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